endangered species – Phrynosoma http://phrynosoma.org/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 21:53:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://phrynosoma.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile-150x150.png endangered species – Phrynosoma http://phrynosoma.org/ 32 32 Animal rights group calls for ban on wildlife trade https://phrynosoma.org/animal-rights-group-calls-for-ban-on-wildlife-trade/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 08:47:37 +0000 https://phrynosoma.org/animal-rights-group-calls-for-ban-on-wildlife-trade/ By RUPI MANGAT Animal rights organization World Animal Protection (WAP) wants the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) to end the multi-billion dollar animal trade , calling it its devastating impact on wildlife populations around the world. According to the WAP, 1.6 trillion wild animals are traded each […]]]>

By RUPI MANGAT

Animal rights organization World Animal Protection (WAP) wants the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) to end the multi-billion dollar animal trade , calling it its devastating impact on wildlife populations around the world.

According to the WAP, 1.6 trillion wild animals are traded each year – dead or alive – and ending the trade would protect Africa’s wildlife from cruelty and exploitation.

WAP investigations revealed shocking images of African gray parrots plucking their feathers, baby cheetahs dying of dehydration and lions so thin their ribs were sticking out, locked in cramped cages waiting to be dispatched, undetected.

“Being legal doesn’t make things fair. This is animal exploitation and abuse,” says Edith Kabesiime, WAP Wildlife Campaigns Manager.

Trade in exotic animals

CITES is an international agreement between governments to ensure that trade in specimens of wild animals and plants does not threaten their survival in the wild.

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CITES data between 2011 and 2015 shows that around 1.5 million live animals were traded as exotic pets and 1.2 million skins were exported legally.

“The top five species from Africa currently exported for the exotic pet trade are the savannah monitor, leopard tortoise, emperor scorpion, African gray parrot and ball python,” said Patrick Muinde, director of WAP search. “Trade can lead to their extinction in the wild. Wildlife is driven out of Africa every day.

Other targeted animals are pangolins, lions and elephants.

Cite appendix two gives countries quotas to export certain products because they have viable animal populations. Appendix 1 does not allow any exchanges. Pangolins are listed in Appendix 1 of the Cites, but the illegal trade in pangolin scales, mainly for use in traditional Chinese medicine, is rampant.

“The sheer scale of wildlife interference impacts not only animals, but also people and our planet. It is high time that CITES parties recognize that wild animals are not commodities. CITES export quota provisions must be completely zeroed out to end the wildlife trade and protect wild animals in their habitats,” Dr Kabesiime said on World Wildlife Day. wildlife this year, March 3.

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SXSW 2022 – Austin Biotech Startup Colossal Wants To Bring Back Lost Species: A Mammoth Moonshot (And It’s Just The Beginning) – Features https://phrynosoma.org/sxsw-2022-austin-biotech-startup-colossal-wants-to-bring-back-lost-species-a-mammoth-moonshot-and-its-just-the-beginning-features/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 12:10:16 +0000 https://phrynosoma.org/sxsw-2022-austin-biotech-startup-colossal-wants-to-bring-back-lost-species-a-mammoth-moonshot-and-its-just-the-beginning-features/ The team behind Colossal, the firm that wants to bring back the woolly mammoth (Photo by John Davidson) One small step for Mammuthus primigeniusa giant leap for humanity. Tell the world your bioscience startup raised $75 million for renowned genomics pioneers to resurrect woolly mammoths, and you’ll likely get a plethora of comparisons for jurassic […]]]>

The team behind Colossal, the firm that wants to bring back the woolly mammoth (Photo by John Davidson)

One small step for Mammuthus primigeniusa giant leap for humanity.

Tell the world your bioscience startup raised $75 million for renowned genomics pioneers to resurrect woolly mammoths, and you’ll likely get a plethora of comparisons for jurassic park. Factor in that some of the investors include former Legendary Entertainment CEO Thomas Tull and Mark Zuckerberg’s early rivals the Winklevoss twins, in addition to fears from some in the company who don’t like to genetically modify anything, and you will also have many questions asking why we should embrace disextinction at all.

However, that’s exactly what Austin-based startup Colossal plans to do, inserting massive genetic information into existing species of African elephants so they share many traits of their distant woolly cousins. such as resistance to cold. The idea is that reintroducing mammoths to their former arctic tundra habitat would have ecological benefits to curb the effects of global warming. The company expects to have a live hybrid mammoth calf within a few years.

But the company’s management doesn’t see it as a marginal scientific ploy to erect prehistoric zoos, nor is Spielberg’s classic film an accurate comparison. Founder Ben Lamm compares the previously improbable and never-before-done task to “the moon landing and the Apollo program”. The path to bring back the mammoth is similar [because] there are no technological or scientific doors to achieve this. He noted that even technology from the 1960s was able to successfully travel to the moon and back, “and there’s a lot of technology that will come out of [this work] who are massively disruptive, like Apollo.

“You see the advancement of synthetic biology and genetic engineering at a phenomenal rate right now.” – Church of St. George

The US mission to land on the moon indeed brought major new innovations, such as GPS, fire-retardant materials, the insulin pump, shock-absorbing sneakers, integrated circuits, and much more. Meanwhile, Colossal’s pursuit to resurrect a mammoth won’t just benefit the field of deextinction, though the technologies could be applied to help save other endangered species. But that’s not all. Some innovations may even be applicable to agriculture and/or human health.

On the software side, Colossal co-founder (and occasional science fiction novelist) Andrew Busey is leading efforts from Austin to develop a more standardized approach to using and sharing genomic data, which is essential to improve collaboration and eliminate the time spent on standardizing this information and modifying genes. Then there’s the wetworks side, which is much cooler and more exciting once you realize the impact it can have one day. For example, the development of the Colossal artificial womb to incubate mammoth hybrids could one day be a game-changer for premature births in human parents.

“Some of the technologies we are developing will help make genetic engineering faster, more efficient and more impactful by treating multiple genes at the same time,” he said. For scale, Lamm co-founder George Church, the prominent geneticist who helped develop CRISPR, started making one genome edit at a time through his lab and now holds the record of 24,000 edits. (multiplex) in a single human cell. “So it’s only within six years. You are seeing the advancement of synthetic biology and genetic engineering at a phenomenal rate right now.

That said, time is probably not the best benchmark for such precise work. And it’s extremely accurate, which is why Colossal hopes its technology will one day help provide comprehensive libraries of genomic data for most species, in the service of genetic engineering.

“Anything is possible, potentially, with the tools available to learn how to accelerate evolution [with other species]said Eriona Hysolli, Head of Biological Sciences. “But I would also like to warn that studies are needed for this to happen. If you want to turn one species into a different species, there is still a lot to do. In other words, Colossal doesn’t do any radical species engineering, so you’ll just have to open a book if you want details on zebras with lizard wings and tails.

Hysolli also thinks that’s why the work done on the mammoth project is more ideal to start with than other animals that are still alive: “It’s just one more way to learn from evolution, by [observing] species that existed before such as the woolly mammoth. While the arctic rewilding of these ancient beasts wasn’t part of a larger long-term mission for the company, she said there’s a lot to be discovered to better understand what’s affecting endangered animals. like elephants.

“I am very passionate about climate change and species preservation. Those are two major themes in what we do,” Lamm said. “But a lot of people just talk about rewilding the Arctic, and we’ve been very transparent: We’re excited about it, but it’s going to take a while.”

The startup’s favorite place to possibly reintroduce mammoths to the wild is Pleistocene Park, a nature reserve in Russian-controlled Siberia. Considering Russia’s recent invasion of the former Soviet territory of Ukraine, taking time might not be such a bad thing. And who knows, maybe one day prominent American genomics researchers might even be among the most effective diplomatic relations with Russia, much as the space program has been in modern times.


Featured session

Colossal Mission: A Case of Disextinction

Friday, March 18, 2:30 p.m., Palais des Congrès

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S’pore Animal Parks welcomed 900 newborn animals in 2021, nearly double the number in 2020 – Mothership.SG https://phrynosoma.org/spore-animal-parks-welcomed-900-newborn-animals-in-2021-nearly-double-the-number-in-2020-mothership-sg/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 08:37:30 +0000 https://phrynosoma.org/spore-animal-parks-welcomed-900-newborn-animals-in-2021-nearly-double-the-number-in-2020-mothership-sg/ Follow us on Telegram for the latest updates: https://t.me/mothershipsg Singapore’s first baby panda was just one of many newborns that Singapore’s four wildlife parks welcomed last year. Baby boom in 2021 Mandai Wildlife Group collectively welcomed 900 hatchlings in 2021, nearly double the number in 2020, the Mandai Wildlife Group said in a press release. […]]]>

Follow us on Telegram for the latest updates: https://t.me/mothershipsg

Singapore’s first baby panda was just one of many newborns that Singapore’s four wildlife parks welcomed last year.

Baby boom in 2021

Mandai Wildlife Group collectively welcomed 900 hatchlings in 2021, nearly double the number in 2020, the Mandai Wildlife Group said in a press release.

Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Wonders and Singapore Zoo have seen the birth of 160 species.

44 of these species have been listed as threatened in the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species.

Here are some of the most charismatic species that have seen additions to their families in 2021.

Sunda slow loris

A baby Sunda slow loris was born on Christmas Day last year at Night Safari.

The species is native to Southeast Asia and classified as an endangered species.

The species is declining in the wild, threatened by growing demand from the illegal pet trade and its supposed healing properties in traditional medicine.

Image via Mandai Wildlife Group.

Image via Mandai Wildlife Group.

African Painted Dogs

A litter of four African painted dogs have joined the pack at Singapore Zoo after a 16-year hiatus.

Endangered globally, the species is named for its tricolor coat.

Dogs are Africa’s most endangered large carnivores, endangered due to human encroachment.

Image via Mandai Wildlife Group.

Image via Mandai Wildlife Group.

Grévy’s zebras

The world’s largest and most endangered species of zebra welcomed a new foal last September to Singapore Zoo.

Managed by the European Association of Zoos and Aquaria’s Endangered Species Programme, Grévy’s zebras in Singapore contribute to “global ex-situ conservation efforts for this highly endangered species”, the press release said.

Native to Kenya and Ethiopia, there are only 3,000 Grévy’s zebras left in the wild.

Image via Mandai Wildlife Group.

Dove with the bleeding heart of the niggers

Jurong Bird Park welcomed three male and female pairs of critically endangered Negros bleeding heart doves from the Philippine island of Negros in September 2021.

Jurong Bird Park and Mandai Nature have partnered with Talarak Foundation Inc (TFI) in Negros Forest Park, Bacolod City, Philippines to set up this breeding program, the first of its kind outside the Philippines.

In addition, the Jurong Bird Park is the only zoological institution to hold this species.

The first chick hatched in November last year, and it is also the only newborn outside of its home country.

The program welcomed two more chicks earlier this year.

Image via Mandai Wildlife Group.

Straw-headed bulbuls

Straw-headed bulbuls are critically endangered birds native to Singapore.

The species was once common in Southeast Asia, but fell victim to the caged bird trade due to their melodic voices.

Here is one of three hatchlings from Jurong Bird Park:

Image via Mandai Wildlife Group.

Golden mantles

70 endangered golden mantlas hatched in Singapore Zoo’s RepTopia last year.

Bright yellow amphibians are endemic to east-central Madagascar.

Image via Mandai Wildlife Group.

Image via Mandai Wildlife Group.

false gharial

For the first time, the Singapore Zoo has successfully bred the False Gharial, or Tomistoma.

It is an endangered crocodile species in Southeast Asia and is notoriously difficult to breed as it requires very specific breeding conditions.

Image via Mandai Wildlife Group.

Sakishima Grass Lizards

A pair of Sakishima grass lizards also hatched last year.

The endangered species was once abundant in the southern islands of Japan, but reproduces slowly as females only lay one or two eggs.

Image via Mandai Wildlife Group.

Baby giant panda, Le Le

Singapore’s beloved giant panda couple, Kai Kai and Jia Jia, also gave birth to Singapore’s first red panda, Le Le, who was born on August 14, 2021.

Since December 30, 2021, Le Le has been meeting visitors at its River Wonders nursery.

Best images by Mandai Wildlife Group.

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Panda cub Le Le among 900 animal and bird births in Mandai in 2021 https://phrynosoma.org/panda-cub-le-le-among-900-animal-and-bird-births-in-mandai-in-2021/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 05:22:24 +0000 https://phrynosoma.org/panda-cub-le-le-among-900-animal-and-bird-births-in-mandai-in-2021/ SINGAPORE — The birth of giant panda cub Le Le last August was just one of nearly 900 new animals and birds born in 2021 at Singapore’s four wildlife parks. In a statement released on Wednesday (February 23rd), the Mandai Wildlife Group (MWG) said these births and hatchings were spread across 160 species, 44 of […]]]>

SINGAPORE — The birth of giant panda cub Le Le last August was just one of nearly 900 new animals and birds born in 2021 at Singapore’s four wildlife parks.

In a statement released on Wednesday (February 23rd), the Mandai Wildlife Group (MWG) said these births and hatchings were spread across 160 species, 44 of which are listed as threatened on the International Union for Conservation of Wildlife’s Red List of Threatened Species. nature.

The group, formerly known as Wildlife Reserves Singapore, manages the Mandai Wildlife Reserve which includes Singapore Zoo, Night Safari, Jurong Bird Park and River Wonders in Singapore.

The birth of Le Le to River Wonders is the result of years of hard work and dedication by animal care teams, as well as a significant breakthrough in MWG’s breeding efforts, according to the release.

Singapore Zoo also welcomed two Grevy’s Zebra foals in September as well as four African Painted Puppies.

The zebras are part of a population management program by the European Association of Zoos and Aquariums. Dogs are one of Africa’s most endangered large carnivores and were once widespread in the continent’s savannahs, but are now endangered.

In the RepTopia section of the zoo, more than 70 endangered golden mantella frogs have hatched along with a pair of Sakishima grass lizards and three endangered Southeast Asian box turtles, also known as the name of Malayan box turtles, native to Singapore.

The zoo also managed to successfully breed the unique false gharial for the first time. Also known as the tomistoma, this endangered species of Southeast Asian crocodile is notoriously difficult to breed under human care as very specific conditions are required for their reproduction.

The Night Safari celebrated last Christmas with the birth of a Sunda slow loris, an endangered species of primate native to Southeast Asia. These primates are threatened with extinction due to growing demand from the illegal pet trade and their purported healing properties.

The statement adds that the birth of the slow loris is “welcome as it contributes to the efforts of the MWG in managing the international ex-situ breeding program for this species”.

Ex-situ breeding programs are those that take place outside of an animal’s natural habitat in zoos or aquariums.

Two masked palm civets were also born at the Night Safari for the first time. Although native to Singapore, sightings of this species have been rare compared to the common palm civet.

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10 endemic species of PHL victims of the ferocity of Odette https://phrynosoma.org/10-endemic-species-of-phl-victims-of-the-ferocity-of-odette/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 16:08:00 +0000 https://phrynosoma.org/10-endemic-species-of-phl-victims-of-the-ferocity-of-odette/ At least 10 Philippine species were believed to have been severely affected by Typhoon Odette (international name Rai) which devastated the Visayas and Mindanao last December, an official with the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) has said. Natividad Y. Bernardino, OCI Director of DENR’s Bureau of Biodiversity Management (BMB), said that despite the […]]]>

At least 10 Philippine species were believed to have been severely affected by Typhoon Odette (international name Rai) which devastated the Visayas and Mindanao last December, an official with the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) has said.

Natividad Y. Bernardino, OCI Director of DENR’s Bureau of Biodiversity Management (BMB), said that despite the lack of exact figures on the extent of the damage, “Typhoon Odette undeniably caused severe damage to wildlife and their habitats.

The Philippine tarsier is one of the smallest primates in the world. This Bohol province tarsier is about 5 inches long, with a tail longer than its body.

Odette has seriously affected the protected landscape and seascape of Siargao Island.

seriously affected

Asked by email, Natividad said that while the DENR-BMB is assessing the damage caused by the typhoon to all affected areas, she noted that it is obvious that it caused serious destruction not only in protected areas, but also to other important ecosystems in the Visayas and Mindanao.

“Important wildlife species and ecosystems are monitored by the DENR and its conservation partners. But due to limited resources, no in-depth research or study has yet been conducted in the country regarding the impact of natural disasters on ecosystems and wildlife,” she explained.

“Ultimately, just like humans, other living organisms, including wildlife, are particularly vulnerable to natural disasters,” she said.

A juvenile crocodile from the Philippines.

Severely affected species

Threatened endemics that have been seen affected by Odette in the Visayas and Mindanao include the Philippine tarsier, one of the world’s smallest primates; bird species, such as the Mindanao hornbill, southern rufous hornbill, twisted hornbill, Camiguin hanging parrot, and reptile species including the Philippine crocodile and sailfish lizard.

Natividad said flying foxes, such as the golden-crowned flying fox and the giant fruit bat, also fear they were badly hit by the devastating typhoon.

It was reported on television news a few days after the typhoon that some residents did not see tarsiers on trees where they used to roost.

Important species

The endemic species affected by Odette are considered important because of their uniqueness and the ecosystem function they provide.

The Philippine tarsier is one of the tourist attractions in Bohol, the site of the famous Chocolate Hills.

The Mindanao hornbill, southern rufous hornbill and twisted hornbill are endangered species, along with the Camiguin hanging parrot, as their populations in the wild decline due to habitat loss, hunting and poaching.

The Philippine crocodile, specifically the Crocodylus mindorensis, is endemic to the Philippines. It is also on the brink of extinction due to habitat loss and hunting.

The population of the sailfin lizard is declining for the same reasons. They are hunted by illegal wildlife traders for the multi-billion peso illegal pet trade.

Considered keystone species, the importance of the golden-crowned fruit bat and giant fruit bat can never be overstated. They are considered the natural farmers of the forest because their droppings, which include the seeds of the fruits they eat, improve the forest vegetation, as well as the bonus of the natural fertilizer that their droppings bring to the forests.

Vulnerable protected areas

Natividad said protected areas and the wildlife they host are vulnerable to natural calamities or extreme weather events.

Natural disasters are considered serious and detrimental threats to the biodiversity of the country’s protected areas due to the damage they can cause to the important and unique ecosystems and wildlife in these areas.

The DENR-BMB, she said, has been actively involved in carrying out assessments in affected protected areas after the occurrence of devastating natural calamities to determine the extent of damage to its ecosystem, species of flora and fauna and the communities that depend on them.

Monitoring activities of DENR and BMB

“A notable initiative by DENR-BMB in the assessment of a protected area after a natural calamity was when a destructive phreatomagmatic eruption of Taal Volcano in January 2020 significantly damaged much of the protected landscape of Taal Volcano,” said she declared.

“Unfortunately, the assessment activity was interrupted when the Covid-19 pandemic hit the country in early 2020 [starting in March]“, she pointed out.

Natividad said the DENR-BMB had been involved in similar activities before.

After the onslaught of Typhoon Ulysses (international name Vamco) in the latter part of 2020, she said, the Department of Environment created a composite team represented by DENR Calabarzon, Bicol Region, Central of Luzon and the regional offices of the Bureau of Mines and Geosciences, Environment Bureau of Management and the DOST-BMB to monitor, evaluate and recommend appropriate measures to be taken for the restoration of the legislated and proclaimed protected areas affected in Cagayan, Marikina and the basin of the Bicol river.

“DENR’s initiatives are consistent with the issuance of Executive Order 120, or ‘Strengthening Rehabilitation and Recovery Efforts in Typhoon Affected Areas through the Establishment of a Task Force for Better Reconstruction,'” she declared.

The DENR, she said, focuses on key areas that focus on intensified water management.

The objective is mainly focused on improving the existing forest cover, recovering easements and stabilizing the banks, setting up a series of control dams and gabions, intensifying forest protection, a-t she noted.

Picture credits: Photo LGU, Wikimedia Commons, Gregg Yan

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We need landowners to protect endangered species on their property https://phrynosoma.org/we-need-landowners-to-protect-endangered-species-on-their-property/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 13:47:08 +0000 https://phrynosoma.org/we-need-landowners-to-protect-endangered-species-on-their-property/ Land tenure categories across Australia. The size of the circle represents the percentage covered by each land tenure. The number inside or beside each circle represents the number of threatened species with more than 5% of their distribution overlapping that land tenure. Over the past decade, the protected area for nature in Australia has increased […]]]>

Land tenure categories across Australia. The size of the circle represents the percentage covered by each land tenure. The number inside or beside each circle represents the number of threatened species with more than 5% of their distribution overlapping that land tenure.

Over the past decade, the protected area for nature in Australia has increased by nearly half. Our national reserve system now covers 20% from the country.

This is a positive step for the thousands of species on the brink of extinction. But this is only one step.

What we desperately need to help these species recover fully is to protect them throughout their range. And that means we need to better protect them on private land.

Our recent search shows it clearly. We have found that almost half (48%) of all distributions of our threatened species occur on private freehold land, even though only 29% of Australia is owned in this way.

In contrast, leasehold land – largely inland cattle grazing properties – covers a whopping 38% of the continent but overlaps only 6% of endangered species distributions. And in our protected reserves? An average of 35% of species distribution.

Why do we need more? Are our protected areas not enough?

When most of us think of saving species, we think of national parks and other safe havens.

This is the best-known strategy and the efforts to expand our network are commendable. New additions include the Narriearra Caryapundy Marshes National Park in northwestern New South Wales, Dryandra Woods National Park in Western Australia, and several Indigenous Protected Areas around Australia, which will provide greater protection for certain species.

But relying on reserves is simply not enough. Seen from the air, Australia is a patchwork of farms, suburbs and fragmented forests. For many species, it has become difficult to find food sources and mates.

Since the beginning of European colonization, we have lost at least 100 species, including three species since 2009.

Almost 2,000 plant and animal species are threatened with extinction, with dozens of reptiles, frogs, butterflies, fish and bird and mammal species are doomed to disappear forever without a drastic change in resourcing and conservation effort.

What we do on our properties matters to nature

Freehold land is home to almost half of our threatened species. Species like the blue-tongued pygmy lizard (Tiliqua adelaidensis) and Gippsland giant earthworm (Megascolides australis) occur almost entirely on private land.

In contrast, leasehold land overlaps only 6% of species distributions. Although this may seem small, species like the highly photogenic Carpenter’s Rat (Zyzomys palatalis) are entirely dependent on leased land.

What about the 1.4% of Australia set aside for logging in state forests? These are also the main habitat of endangered species such as Simson’s stag beetle (Hoplogonus simsoni), which has more than two-thirds of its distribution in the state forests of northwestern Tasmania. Likewise, the Colquhoun Grevillea (Grevillea celata) is only known from one state forest in the Gippsland region of Victoria.

Even tusk lands – covering less than 1% of Australia – are the sole home of some species. Take the Cape Range Remedy (Kumonga exleyi), known only from an Air Force bombing area near Exmouth, Western Australia, or Match Byfield shrub (Comesperma oblongatum), which survives in the highly biodiverse military training area of ​​Shoalwater Bay in Queensland.

The aboriginal domain across Australia intersects with nearly all of these tenure types and is also critically important to half of Australia’s distributions of threatened species, as shown Previous search.

We need everyone on deck to maintain the persistence of our endangered species

It’s late in the day to save Australia’s endangered species as climate change increases the challenges they face. If we are to have a real chance of reversing the trend, we must do much more.

To stem the heartbreaking tide of endangered species, we must actively manage multiple threats to their existence in many different types of land tenure.

Logging of native forest and some intensive farming methods continue to endanger many endangered speciesespecially those who depend on these land types for their survival.

Over 380 endangered species have part of their range on land set aside for logging. It should come as no surprise that logging is a key threat for 64 of these threatened species.

How to achieve better conservation outside protected areas?

Many landowners are acutely aware of the species they share their land with and are already taking steps to protect them. A key method is the use of land partnerships, in which landowners and custodians work with conservationists.

Take Sue and Tom Shephard, who run a large cattle property on cape york. Their station is home to some of the last survivors golden-shouldered parrots (Psephotus chrysopterygius). The Shephards are working to bring the species back to the brink through careful management of pasture, fire and wild animals.

Likewise, the work of hundreds of rice farmers helps save endangered people australian bittern (Botaurus poiciloptilus). Each year, up to a third of the remaining population descends on the rice paddies of New South Wales to breed. Rice farmers welcome these birds by ensuring that there is permanent water early, reducing the number of predators and strengthening their habitat.

We are seeing successes even in the field of defense forces. The Yampi Sound training area in the Kimberley is a biodiversity hotspot. A Partnership between the Department of Defense and the Australian Wildlife Conservancy helps protect these species alongside defense force use. This model could be extended to other areas of the defense territory.

What’s stopping more people from taking action?

Although many landowners want to help, financial constraints, a lack of awareness or concerns about the implications for resale of land can be barriers.

If we want to encourage more landowners to directly conserve species on their land, we must start by understanding what they want. Only then can we design initiatives to help these species, as well as benefit and engage landowners.

What does it look like? Imagine financial incentives for joining conservation programs. Or workshops where landowners can see the very real benefits to their own lands by reducing erosion, controlling rabbit numbers, protecting waterways from silt or introduced water-sucking trees, or reducing wind and dust by reserving land for trees.

If a farmer or landowner can clearly see the benefits for wildlife and for their own use, they are much more likely to participate.

Incentives must be neither financially. If landowners understand what works and feel empowered after the training, and have technical support and assistance to rely on, they are more likely to start making their land friendlier to the threatened species.

If we are serious about protecting our species, we must do more to attract Australian farmers, landowners and other land stewards. We cannot rely solely on protected areas. We must make the earth safer for our most endangered species, wherever they are.


Protected areas alone will not save all endangered species


Provided by The Conversation


This article is republished from The conversation under Creative Commons license. Read it original article.The conversation

Quote: National Parks Are Not Enough: We Need Landholders to Protect Endangered Species on Their Property (February 11, 2022) Retrieved February 11, 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2022-02-national-landholders -threatened-species-property-1.html

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National parks are not enough – we need landowners to protect endangered species on their property https://phrynosoma.org/national-parks-are-not-enough-we-need-landowners-to-protect-endangered-species-on-their-property/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://phrynosoma.org/national-parks-are-not-enough-we-need-landowners-to-protect-endangered-species-on-their-property/ Over the past decade, the protected area for nature in Australia has increased by nearly half. Our national reserve system now covers 20 percent of the country. This is a positive step for the thousands of species on the brink of extinction. But this is only one step. What we desperately need to help these […]]]>

Over the past decade, the protected area for nature in Australia has increased by nearly half. Our national reserve system now covers 20 percent of the country.

This is a positive step for the thousands of species on the brink of extinction. But this is only one step.

What we desperately need to help these species recover fully is to protect them throughout their range. And that means we need to better protect them on private land.

Our recent search shows it clearly. We have found that almost half (48%) of all distributions of our threatened species occur on private freehold land, even though only 29% of Australia is owned in this way.

In contrast, leasehold land – largely inland cattle grazing properties – covers as much as 38% of the continent, but overlaps just 6% of the distribution of threatened species. And in our protected reserves? An average of 35 percent of the species distribution.

Land tenure categories across Australia. The size of the circle represents the percentage covered by each land tenure. The number inside or beside each circle represents the number of threatened species with more than 5% of their distribution overlapping that land tenure.

Why do we need more? Are our protected areas not enough?

When most of us think of saving species, we think of national parks and other safe havens.

This is the best-known strategy and the efforts to expand our network are commendable. New additions include the Narriearra Caryapundy Marshes National Park in northwestern New South Wales, Dryandra Woods National Park in Western Australia, and several Indigenous Protected Areas around Australia, which will provide greater protection for certain species.

But relying on reserves is simply not enough. Seen from the air, Australia is a patchwork of farms, suburbs and fragmented forests. For many species, it has become difficult to find food sources and mates.

Since the beginning of European colonization, we have lost at least 100 speciesincluding three species since 2009.

Almost 2,000 plant and animal species are threatened with extinction, with dozens of reptile, frog, butterfly, fish and bird and mammal species are doomed to disappear forever without a drastic change in resourcing and conservation effort.

What we do on our properties matters to nature

Freehold land is home to almost half of our threatened species. Species like the blue-tongued pygmy lizard (Tiliqua adelaidensis) and Gippsland giant earthworm (Megascolids australis) occur almost entirely on private land.

The blue-tongued pygmy lizard. Nick Volpe.

The Gippsland Giant Earthworm. Beverly Van Praagh.

In contrast, leasehold land overlaps only 6% of species distributions. Although it may seem low, species like the highly photogenic carpenter rock rat (Zyzomys palatalis) rely entirely on leased land.

The carpenter rock rat. Michael J. Barritt.

What about the 1.4% of Australia set aside for logging in state forests? These are also the main habitat of endangered species such as Simson’s stag beetle (Hoplogonus simsoni), which has more than two-thirds of its distribution in the state forests of northwestern Tasmania. Likewise, the Colquhoun Grevillea (Grevillea celata) is only known from one state forest in the Gippsland region of Victoria.

Simson’s stag beetle. simon grove

Grevillea

Colquhoun Grevillea. Wikicommons/Melburnian, CC BY

Even tusk lands – covering less than 1% of Australia – are the sole home of some species. Take the Cape Range Remedy (Kumonga exleyi), known only from an Air Force bombing area near Exmouth, Western Australia, or Match Byfield shrub (Comesperma oblongatum), which survives in the highly biodiverse military training area of ​​Shoalwater Bay, Queensland.

The aboriginal domain across Australia intersects with nearly all of these tenure types and is also critically important to half of Australia’s distributions of threatened species, as shown Previous search.

We need everyone on deck to maintain the persistence of our endangered species

It’s late in the day to save Australia’s endangered species as climate change increases the challenges they face. If we are to have a real chance of reversing the trend, we must do much more.

To stem the heartbreaking tide of endangered species, we must actively manage multiple threats to their existence in many different types of land tenure.

Logging of native forest and some intensive farming methods continue to endanger many endangered speciesespecially those who depend on these land types for their survival.

More than 380 endangered species have part of their range on land set aside for logging. It should come as no surprise that logging is a key threat for 64 of these threatened species.

How to achieve better conservation outside protected areas?

Many landowners are acutely aware of the species they share their land with and are already taking steps to protect them. A key method is the use of land partnerships, in which landowners and custodians work with conservationists.

Take Sue and Tom Shephard, who run a large cattle property on cape york. Their station is home to some of the last survivors golden-shouldered parrots (Psephotus chrysopterygius). The Shephards are working to bring the species back to the brink through careful management of pasture, fire and wild animals.

Likewise, the work of hundreds of rice farmers helps save endangered people australian bittern (Botaurus poiciloptilus). Each year, up to a third of the remaining population descends on the rice paddies of New South Wales to breed. Rice farmers welcome these birds by ensuring that there is permanent water early, reducing the number of predators and strengthening their habitat.

We are seeing successes even in the field of defense forces. The Yampi Sound training area in the Kimberley is a biodiversity hotspot. A Partnership between the Department of Defense and the Australian Wildlife Conservancy helps protect these species alongside defense force use. This model could be extended to other areas of the defense territory.

What’s stopping more people from taking action?

Although many landowners want to help, financial constraints, a lack of awareness or concerns about the implications for resale of land can be barriers.

If we want to encourage more landowners to directly conserve species on their land, we must start by understanding what they want. Only then can we design initiatives to help these species, as well as benefit and engage landowners.

What does it look like? Imagine financial incentives for joining conservation programs. Or workshops where landowners can see the very real benefits to their own lands by reducing erosion, controlling rabbit numbers, protecting waterways from silt or introduced water-sucking trees, or reducing wind and dust by reserving land for trees.

If a farmer or landowner can clearly see the benefits for wildlife and for their own use, they are much more likely to participate.

Incentives must be neither financially. If landowners understand what works and feel empowered after training, and have technical support and assistance to rely on, they are more likely to embark on a path to making their land more friendly to endangered species.

If we are serious about protecting our species, we must do more to attract Australian farmers, landowners and other land stewards. We cannot rely solely on protected areas. We must make the earth safer for our most endangered species, wherever they are.

Josie Carwardine and Anthea Coggan of CSIRO contributed to this research

The conversation

Stephen KearneyPhD student, The University of Queensland; April stayLecturer, The University of Queensland; James WatsonProfessor, The University of Queensland; Rebecca Louise NelsonLecturer in Law, The University of Melbourne; Rebecca SpindlerAssistant Professor, UNSW Sydneyand vanessa adamsLecturer, Discipline of Geography and Space Sciences, University of Tasmania

This article is republished from The conversation under Creative Commons license. Read it original article.

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Texas biology professor charged with illegally smuggling exotic animal parts into US https://phrynosoma.org/texas-biology-professor-charged-with-illegally-smuggling-exotic-animal-parts-into-us/ Mon, 31 Jan 2022 17:29:00 +0000 https://phrynosoma.org/texas-biology-professor-charged-with-illegally-smuggling-exotic-animal-parts-into-us/ A University of Texas biology professor faces charges of allegedly smuggling exotic animal parts into the United States, prosecutors said. Richard Kazmaier, 54, who is an associate professor at West Texas A&M University in Canyon, Texas, was charged with allegedly importing protected wildlife items into the country without declaring them or obtaining the proper permits […]]]>

A University of Texas biology professor faces charges of allegedly smuggling exotic animal parts into the United States, prosecutors said.

Richard Kazmaier, 54, who is an associate professor at West Texas A&M University in Canyon, Texas, was charged with allegedly importing protected wildlife items into the country without declaring them or obtaining the proper permits from US Fish. and Wildlife Service.

He received a summons last Thursday at his university office, according to court documents.

Prosecutors say that between 2017 and 2020, Kazmaier imported skulls, skeletons and taxidermy mounts of a number of exotic animals, including a golden jackal, caracal, Eurasian otter, vervet monkey and a variety of exotic birds.

It was unclear what Kazmaier, who is an expert on western snakes, lizards and tortoises, was using the animal parts for.

A message left for Kazmaier was not returned, and it was not immediately clear whether he had retained a lawyer.

In a statement, West Texas A&M said the case against Kazmaier — who has taught at the school since 2001 — did not involve the university.

“West Texas A&M University is aware of the situation involving a faculty member,” the statement said. “We are not specifically commenting on ongoing court cases, but the indictment does not implicate the University. WT will follow the matter closely.

The Endangered Species Act and federal regulations require anyone importing wildlife to report what they are bringing into the country to Customs and US Fish and Wildlife Service officials. Special permits for certain protected species are also required, including many animals that Kazmaier is said to have imported.

He faces up to 20 years in prison and $250,000 if convicted, prosecutors said.

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Lawsuit challenges denial of endangered species protection for Florida lizard https://phrynosoma.org/lawsuit-challenges-denial-of-endangered-species-protection-for-florida-lizard/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 17:45:00 +0000 https://phrynosoma.org/lawsuit-challenges-denial-of-endangered-species-protection-for-florida-lizard/ MIAMI— The Center for Biological Diversity for follow-up the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today for a Trump administration decision to deny the Cedar Key mole skink protection under the Endangered Species Act. The agency predicts that climate change and rising seas will flood nearly a third of the lizard’s coastal habitat by 2060 and […]]]>

MIAMI— The Center for Biological Diversity for follow-up the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today for a Trump administration decision to deny the Cedar Key mole skink protection under the Endangered Species Act.

The agency predicts that climate change and rising seas will flood nearly a third of the lizard’s coastal habitat by 2060 and nearly two-thirds by the end of the century. Even more habitats will be degraded by storm surges and saltwater intrusion. Worse still, urban development will prevent the animal from moving to higher ground over about half of its remaining occupied range.

“Cedar’s key mole skink is on the front lines of the climate crisis, and federal protections are crucial,” said Elise Bennett, senior counsel at the Center’s Florida office. “As sea level rise caused by climate change steadily invades Florida’s shores, the skink will have nowhere to live. The federal government must act now to halt rising global temperatures and protect this beautiful lizard.

Adorned with a light pink tail, the skink lives exclusively on the shores of the Cedar Key Islands along about 10 miles of Florida’s Gulf Coast. It burrows in dry sand and hunts for insects under leaves, debris and washed up vegetation on beaches.

Accelerating sea level rise and increasingly frequent storms threaten to flood the skink’s coastal habitat, squeezing it into smaller and smaller areas. Because the animals only survive in a few populations over a small geographic area, a single major storm could wipe out the entire subspecies.

In 2020, a federal district court judge found that the Service unlawfully denied protection to the closely related Florida Keys mole skink, which is also at serious risk from rising sea levels. The court found that the agency had not justified why it had not used more accurate climate projections that predicted sea level rise 15% higher than the predictions used by the agency. The Service relied on the same outdated science to deny protection to the Cedar Key mole skink.

“The Fish and Wildlife Service already knows that reliance on this outdated climate science is unjustifiable,” Bennett said. “It is time to go back and make a new decision using the best available scientific information. Anything less will fail to effectively combat the growing threat of climate change to the skink and so many other Florida species that share a similar fate.

The center petitioned to protect the Cedar Key mole skink under the Endangered Species Act in 2010. In 2015, the Service concluded that the lizard could warrant Endangered Species Act protections. But in 2018, the agency ultimately denied him those protections.

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Nine arrested in protected species bust https://phrynosoma.org/nine-arrested-in-protected-species-bust/ Sun, 23 Jan 2022 13:09:11 +0000 https://phrynosoma.org/nine-arrested-in-protected-species-bust/ Source: Civil Guard The Guardia Civil has arrested nine people involved in the sale of protected species, all covered by the international CITES agreement. The individuals were all arrested for animal abuse and cash trafficking. Officers were able to rescue animals sent in parcels and confiscate more than 100 ivory items and numerous snake and […]]]>
Source: Civil Guard

The Guardia Civil has arrested nine people involved in the sale of protected species, all covered by the international CITES agreement. The individuals were all arrested for animal abuse and cash trafficking.

Officers were able to rescue animals sent in parcels and confiscate more than 100 ivory items and numerous snake and lizard skins. All items were for illegal sale locally.

The nine who were under investigation are from Álava, Guipúzcoa, Vizcaya and the Autonomous Community of Cantabria.

What species were sold?

According to SEPRONA agents, the gang was selling elaborate pieces of ivory and python skins on the internet. The public prosecutor’s office in collaboration with DHL parcels intercepted parcels containing lizards and even a royal python. Animals were sent in shoeboxes, with most arriving dehydrated, injured and sometimes dead. None of the packages met the standards required for the transport of animals.

All recovered animals were sent to Karpin Abentura Recovery Center.

Trafficking in protected species

Specimens of the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) and its parts, as well as products of this species, and those from snakes such as those found (Phitonidae), are included in Appendices I and II of the Convention on international trade in endangered species of wild fauna and flora, CITES, (Washington, March 3, 1973) and Annex A of Council Regulation (EC) No. 338/97 of December 9, 1996 on the protection of species of wild fauna and flora through trade and marketing thereof is prohibited .

Illegal trafficking and poaching of wildlife is one of the biggest threats to biodiversity in the world. The European Union has approved the European Action Plan to combat illegal trafficking and international poaching of these wild species, adapted in Spain to apply the appropriate measures (PLAN TIFIES), in response to the call made by the UN to combat this problem. This has been a major challenge in the field of nature conservation around the world, which aims to help put an end to this type of illegal activity.

CITES

The Civil Guard warns that the protection of fauna species listed in the CITES (International Convention on Wildlife Trafficking) appendices affects any living or dead specimen, as well as its parts or products. If the origin of the specimens is not known at the time of acquisition, or of the pieces that may have undergone any type of transformation, we must take into account that they could have the highest possible degree of protection. For this reason, it is noted that acts of possession, advertisement, trade or destruction of protected wildlife species must be documented regularly. Likewise, it is recalled that the shipment of live animals must be carried out by certified companies, providing the mandatory documentation that must accompany the animal (health card, CITES certificate, health guide or any other document proving its legal origin) .

The survey is part of the Spanish Action Plan against Illegal Trafficking and International Poaching of Wildlife (Plan TIFIES) and the LIFE GUARDIANES DE LA NATURALEZA project.

The nine people arrested will appear in court this week, charged under the Protected Species Act and with animal abuse.


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