Georgia wildlife officials warn of invasive lizard species

IN WASHINGTON, I AM AIXA DIAZ. ALL NEW THIS MORNING…GEORGIA WILDLI FE OFFICIALS ASK YOU TO BE ATTENTIVE TO *THESE – *INVASIVE LIZARDS…SPOTTED HERE IN THE R OU REGION. THE DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES HAS SA .YS. SO FAR…THEY HAVE ONLY BEEN FOUND ITON OMBS AND TATTNA CLLOUNTIES. OFFICIALS SAY… THEY CAN LIVE ALMOST ANYWHERE… AND EAT ALMOST ANYTHING. THE LIZARDS HAVE ALSO BEEN SPOTTED IN SOUTH CAROLINA. WE TOLD YOU IN 20-20…THIS LIZARD WAS SPOTTED IN LEXINGTON COUNTY…NEAR COLUMB

Georgia wildlife officials warn of invasive lizard species that can ‘eat almost anything’

Georgia wildlife officials warn that if tegus become established in the wild, they will be nearly impossible to eradicate.

Video above: Your Monday headlinesSOCIAL CIRCLE, Ga. (AP) — The Georgia Wildlife Agency is asking residents to report sightings of an invasive lizard that may pose a threat to native species. Georgia tegus before the lizards could thrive in greater numbers. So far, the only known wild population in the state has been found in Toombs and Tattnall counties in southeast Georgia. TRENDING STORIES An Effingham County child continues to recover from a near-drowning accident How a Bloomingdale woman is working to keep Southeast Georgia safe, reports Three deaths in Georgia shootings reported by gunsWildlife officials hope to prevent the black and white lizards from spreading further. They can be up to 1.2 meters long and weigh up to 4.5 kilograms. They have a varied appetite that favors the eggs of turtles, alligators, and ground-nesting birds. “They can live almost anywhere and eat almost anything,” DNR wildlife biologist Daniel Sollenberger said in a press release. “We can after they are detected,” Sollenberger said. With locals, hunters, and others helping us monitor and control tegus, we are cautiously optimistic about our ability to control this population.” Officials do not know how tegu were introduced. in the wild in Georgia, but they are usually kept as pets. Last year, the DNR removed a single tegu which was spotted on a game camera and later caught in a trap. Seven were collected, dead and alive, in 2020. Wildlife officials warn that if tegus become established in the wild, they will be nearly impossible to eradicate.Wild populations have also been found in South Carolina and Florida. eage at a site along Everglades National Park can produce hundreds of lizards each season.

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SOCIAL CIRCLE, Ga. (AP) — The Georgia Wildlife Agency is asking residents to report sightings of an invasive lizard that may pose a threat to native species.

The state Department of Natural Resources is trying to locate and eradicate South American tegus from Georgia before the lizards can thrive in larger numbers. So far, the only known wild population in the state has been found in Toombs and Tattnall counties in southeast Georgia.

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Wildlife officials hope to prevent the black and white lizards from spreading further. They can be up to 1.2 meters long and weigh up to 4.5 kilograms. They have a varied appetite that favors the eggs of turtles, alligators, and ground-nesting birds.

“They can live almost anywhere and eat almost anything,” MNR wildlife biologist Daniel Sollenberger said in a news release.

“We are focusing our efforts on achieving two goals: documenting the extent of tegus presence in the southeast Georgia wilderness and removing these animals as soon as possible after they are detected,” Sollenberger said. “With locals, hunters and others helping us monitor and control tegus, we are cautiously optimistic about our ability to control this population.”

Authorities aren’t sure exactly how tegus were introduced to the wild in Georgia, but they are commonly kept as pets.

Last year, the DNR removed a single tegu that was spotted on a game camera and later caught in a trap. Seven were recovered, dead and alive, in 2020.

Wildlife officials warn that if tegus become established in the wild, they will be nearly impossible to eradicate. Wild populations have also been found in South Carolina and Florida. Trapping at a site along Everglades National Park can produce hundreds of lizards each season.

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