Folsom Police reunites tegu lizard with owner after reptile escapes

Folsom Police reunited a tegu lizard with its owner a day after the reptile was caught roaming the streets. The lizard was discovered near School Street and Penaranda Drive on Thursday and taken to Folsom Zoo, which agreed to hold the reptile until it could be claimed by its owner. After police asked for the public’s help in identifying his owner, that person came forward and found his pet on Friday morning. Sarah Deveny said she had a “big enough” outdoor enclosure for the lizard “and he must have just banged his head against the door as many times as he could and broke the screws. ‘We’ll have to fix that “, she said. Argentine black and white tegus are native to South America and can grow to almost 5 feet long. Deveny said she had her lizard for three years and it continues to grow in California. The Golden State is a harsh climate for tropical species, unlike Florida. “It’s too cold here in the winter,” said California Department of Fish and Wildlife spokesman Peter Tira.Correction (Mar 11, 2022): An earlier version of this story was wrong when the lizard was discovered.

Folsom Police reunited a tegu lizard with its owner a day after the reptile was caught roaming the streets.

The lizard was discovered near School Street and Penaranda Drive on Thursday and taken to Folsom Zoo, which agreed to keep the reptile until it could be claimed by its owner.

After police asked for the public’s help in identifying his owner, that person came forward and found his pet on Friday morning.

Sarah Deveny said she had a “fairly large” outdoor enclosure for the lizard “and he had to bang his head against the door as many times as he could and break the screws”.

“We will have to fix this,” she said.

Argentine black and white tegus are native to South America and can grow to nearly 5 feet in length.

Deveny said she had her lizard for three years and it continued to grow.

They are considered an invasive species in Florida but are legal to have as pets in California.

The Golden State is a harsh climate for tropical species, unlike Florida.

“It’s too cold here in the winter,” California Department of Fish and Wildlife spokesman Peter Tira said.

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Correction (March 11, 2022): An earlier version of this story was wrong when the lizard was discovered.

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