Lizard reptile – Phrynosoma http://phrynosoma.org/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 02:33:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.2 https://phrynosoma.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile-150x150.png Lizard reptile – Phrynosoma http://phrynosoma.org/ 32 32 Reptile hailed as world’s first “four-legged snake” turns out to be just a lizard https://phrynosoma.org/reptile-hailed-as-worlds-first-four-legged-snake-turns-out-to-be-just-a-lizard/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 22:16:20 +0000 https://phrynosoma.org/reptile-hailed-as-worlds-first-four-legged-snake-turns-out-to-be-just-a-lizard/ A new investigation of a creature hailed as the world’s first “four-legged snake” upon discovery has revealed that it was, in fact, just a lizard. A study published in 2015 claimed that a 120-million-year-old fossil discovered in Brazil, nicknamed Tetrapodophis amplectus – Greek for “four-legged snake” – was the first snake to have more than […]]]>

A new investigation of a creature hailed as the world’s first “four-legged snake” upon discovery has revealed that it was, in fact, just a lizard.

A study published in 2015 claimed that a 120-million-year-old fossil discovered in Brazil, nicknamed Tetrapodophis amplectus – Greek for “four-legged snake” – was the first snake to have more than two limbs. The other early snake fossils only had two.

But scientists from Canada said they doubted the results from the start, as did their own study of the fossil, the University of Toronto said in a statement this week.

“I was so upset with this kind of mediocre science that makes it one of the best scientific journals,” said biology professor Robert Reisz.

“Shortly after the original publication, we secured access to the specimen by lifting the hell up, and then we were able to study it… a snake, but a small lizard.

For starters, its skull looks more like a lizard than a snake, lacking the ability to separate bones to swallow prey whole. Its teeth were also more like a lizard’s than a snake’s – the latter having curved incisors to prevent live prey from escaping.

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12 best reptile pets for beginners and experts https://phrynosoma.org/12-best-reptile-pets-for-beginners-and-experts/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 17:55:05 +0000 https://phrynosoma.org/12-best-reptile-pets-for-beginners-and-experts/ Forget about cats and dogs. Today we are talking about the best reptile pets for beginners and experts. Reptiles as pets are a great option for a multitude of reasons. For homeowners looking for a relatively easy-to-maintain, unique or even hypoallergenic, reptiles are an excellent choice. However, each animal has a unique and important set […]]]>

Forget about cats and dogs. Today we are talking about the best reptile pets for beginners and experts.

Reptiles as pets are a great option for a multitude of reasons. For homeowners looking for a relatively easy-to-maintain, unique or even hypoallergenic, reptiles are an excellent choice. However, each animal has a unique and important set of care requirements, so it’s best to understand the basic needs that suit your lifestyle well.

Reptiles come in many shapes and sizes, and while some have higher care needs, others are low-maintenance. Whether you are new to reptile ownership or are a seasoned reptile owner, we have rounded up several species known to be excellent pets. The essentials and theme we were looking for was low maintenance. Nevertheless, they need a significant investment in adequate housing, veterinary care and the right diet, but this list requires much less compared to others exotic animals the low.

Best reptile pets for beginners

1. Leopard gecko

Hardy and docile, a leopard gecko makes an excellent pet for beginners. These spotted geckos are quiet and easy to care for, making them great additions to any family. They have easily accessible caloric and dietary needs (they only eat insects!), Contributing to ease of possession. However, they are nocturnal, so if your family is active early in the morning or at night, you may experience their maximum activity!

2. Russian turtle

Russian tortoise turtle in a terrarium.

A Russian turtle is a better choice than the popular red-eared slider due to the different maintenance requirements and the ability to interact with a human. Relatively small in turtle scale (maximum 8-10 inches), these turtles are very hardy, making them a great choice. They also do not have the water requirements of other reptiles, as they get most of their moisture from their food. However, turtles live up to 50 years, which is a long-term commitment.

3. Crested gecko

Crested gecko resting on a green leaf.

Crested geckos are generally a docile but entertaining reptile. This species of gecko is arboreal and requires an enclosure that is taller than it is long, making it an easy pet for someone who may not have a lot of space for an enclosure. Their dietary needs are readily available through insects and commercial foods, making them not only entertaining but also convenient. The long ridges on their bodies and eyes make them look like cartoons.

4. Ball python

Ball python snake moves along a log.

For those who want a legless companion, king pythons are one of the more popular choices. These snakes are a bit shy and small in size, which many first-time snake owners like. They come in a variety of color variations and range from three to five feet in length. Another factor to consider is the lifespan as they average around 25-30 years which is a long time so be sure to commit!

They don’t have elaborate tank requirements, which makes them favorable to new owners, and is just one of many reasons to own a pet snake.

5. Corn snake

Corn snake wrapped around a woman's hand

Smaller in size and very calm, these colorful snakes make excellent pets. However, they like to climb branches, so they need an enclosure that gives them some space to do so. Corn snakes spend the rest of their time hiding and digging. Due to their curiosity, they are incredible escape artists, so it’s important to make sure their tank and cover are secure.

6. Water dragon

Green water dragon standing on a log stump.

Water dragons are full of personality and courage! However, with the right, regulated habitat in place, you spend more time enjoying it than looking after it. A lot of people want to own iguanas without realizing how much space they take up or their aggressive nature, and the water dragon is a good compromise as they are much smaller and much friendlier, without losing those qualities. similar physical.

7. Bearded dragon

A bearded dragon shows affection held by its owner

Bearded people have easy grooming needs and, when well socialized, love interactions. They are known for their outgoing personalities which are unique to each other, making them great additions to a family. Bigger than geckos but smaller than an iguana, this species of lizard is great for animal lovers of all ages.

Bearded dragons are omnivorous and eat insects and vegetables. They’re also diurnal, so they’re awake during the day, making them a great pet for anyone who spends a lot of time around the house.

8. Chameleon

Elliot's chameleon, known as Trioceros ellioti, clings to a branch with its tail curled up

Boniface Muthoni / SOPA Images / LightRocket via Getty Images

Some believe that chameleons are not perfect for beginners, mainly due to their specific environmental needs which must be kept constant and precise. we recommend that you work with an expert on their accommodation.

If you are not interested in handling your pet reptile, this is a great option as it can easily get stressed out when handled. With their ability to change colors, they make a very interesting and unique pet if you are up to the challenge.

9. Cursor with red ears

Red-eared turtle resting on a log in the sun.

Considered the most popular pet turtle today, its freshwater friend needs daily feeding when young, while the older red-eared turtle can be fed once every two or three. three days. Recognizable by a small red stripe where its ears would be, this semi-aquatic turtle is omnivorous and considered one of the 100 most invasive species in the world.

10. African turtle

Newborn African stimulated turtle sitting on front turtle head

Ulises Ruiz / AFP via Getty Images

Meet one of the largest species of turtles in the world! For this reason, Sulcata Turtles (as they are also called) should be housed outdoors in a well-constructed area that provides both vegetation, humidity controls, and space to roam. They are strictly herbivorous and do not require any animal protein, fruit, or prepackaged pet turtle food. Their popularity as pets can be attributed to their ability to adapt to different conditions. Make sure you live in a generally warm climate though, as they will need an artificial heat source if temperatures drop below around 60 degrees.

An important note: With an expected lifespan of around 70 years, they can outlive you, so make plans.

11. Eastern Box Turtle

The handler holds the eastern box turtle while the young child watches

Matt McClain / The Washington Post via Getty Images

These turtles are long-lived, but they don’t have the aquatic requirements like the red-eared sliders. Eastern box turtles live in varied climates, so they are quite adaptable and omnivorous, enjoying leafy vegetables in their terrariums. When it comes to keep turtles as pets, it is a great choice for beginners.

12. Green anole

Green Anole Lizard basking on wood, sending signals with dewlapGreen anoles are small and fearful but very active. Like the chameleon, they are rather a reptile that looks without touching, and handling them is not recommended as they may escape. They need a diet of live insects and because they are smaller reptiles with faster metabolisms. They need to be fed more often.

Best reptile for a beginner?

All of these reptiles are excellent candidates. However, the bearded dragon offers the perfect blend of beauty and simple yet proper care, making them and the leopard gecko ideal reptiles for beginners.

The worst reptiles for beginners?

Although they are well known, iguanas are notoriously fussy for many reasons – they are spatial needs, powerful claws and tail, and a fiery (often aggressive) temperament offers more harm than good to novices. We recommend that you avoid them and any giant snake species, especially since most require special attention.

Keep in mind that these popular pets need a gallon tank large enough to house them, as well as a substrate and environment to keep them comfortable. Many pet lizards also love to bask under UVB light sources, so be sure to research the options that work best for your home.

Whatever your choice, big or small, prepare a ball of fun with your new reptile!

Do you own one of these best pet reptiles? Share them on our Great Facebook Pets!

The original post was published on March 26, 2016.

READ MORE: What Exactly Do Pet Turtles Eat?

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See giant crocodiles, turtles, and snakes in this reptile garden https://phrynosoma.org/see-giant-crocodiles-turtles-and-snakes-in-this-reptile-garden/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 11:30:00 +0000 https://phrynosoma.org/see-giant-crocodiles-turtles-and-snakes-in-this-reptile-garden/ Reptile lovers will find this reptile garden an irresistible stop on their South Dakota itinerary … and it’s also the largest in the world. South Dakota is perhaps best known for Mount Rushmore (which is also worth a visit). But there is more to this Great Plains state than being very far from where you […]]]>

Reptile lovers will find this reptile garden an irresistible stop on their South Dakota itinerary … and it’s also the largest in the world.

South Dakota is perhaps best known for Mount Rushmore (which is also worth a visit). But there is more to this Great Plains state than being very far from where you live, having giant presidential heads, and having one of the coldest climates in the country. Reptile Gardens is a wildlife park just south of Rapid City on the route to the Mount Rushmore National Memorial.

Reptile Gardens is definitely a great attraction for families offering a fun and educational day out for everyone to enjoy. Another great wildlife attraction in the United States is Bearizona, where one can go on a North American wildlife safari.


About reptile gardens

According to Guinness Book of World Records, Reptile Gardens is the largest reptile zoo in the world. The was first cited in 2014, then recertified by Guinness in the 2018 edition of the book.

  • The biggest: It is the largest reptile zoo in the world – according to the Guinness Book of World Records

The Reptile Zoo is family oriented and one of South Dakota’s top attractions. It was originally founded by Earl Brockelsby (who was then only 21) and it was opened in 1937. Earl was mystified by the fear of snakes as well as their interest in snakes, he put in place a small exhibit of snakes.


  • Opening hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. – 6 p.m. (Depending on the season)

Today, Reptile Gardens remains family owned and operated and is home to more reptile species than any other zoo in the world.

Related: Here Are The Top Rated Tourist Attractions In South Dakota Besides Mount Rushmore

About the Snakes and the Reptile Gardens Snake Show

The Reptile Gardens offer a range of family shows, including their famous snake show. We will see their snake handling experts and learn all about these often misunderstood reptiles. Their snake keepers introduce visitors to poisonous and non-poisonous snakes and at the end of the show there will be a chance to pet a python.


The park’s snake show is truly intriguing and educational. Snake keepers bring out the physical attributes of harmless snakes and teach the awesome strength of these constrictors. Then learn about the different types of poisonous snakes, including the cobra.

We will learn more about snake safety, including who to keep safe if one comes face to face with the crawling snakes in the wild.

  • Python: You can pet a python at Reptile Gardens
  • Fun fact: Crocodiles are closer to birds than lizards

Only about a third of snake species are poisonous and less than 10% are dangerously poisonous. In the United States, only about 10% of snake species are poisonous. Australia, on the other hand, really deserves its reputation with around 65% of all its species of poisonous snakes.


  • New Zealand: Although New Zealand is considered close to Australia, there are no snakes in New Zealand
  • The longest snake: The oldest snake alive today is the reticulated python
  • The largest poisonous snake: The King Cobra can reach lengths of over 18 feet
  • Oldest Snake: African Ball Python has lived for 44 years

Admission cost

Admission is affordable for most families and is a big draw if one goes to Mount Rushmore.

Spring season and fall season – March 5 to May 26 and September 6 to October 31:

  • Adult: $ 15.00 (16 years old and over)
  • Youth: $ 12.00 (11 to 15 years old)
  • Child: $ 10.00 (4 to 10 years old) – Under 4 years old Free

Summer season: May 27 – September 5:


  • Adult: $ 21.00 (16 years old and over)
  • Youth: $ 17.00 (11 to 15 years old)
  • Child: $ 15.00 (4 to 10 years old) – Under 4 years old Free

Winter season: November 1 to 30

  • Adult: $ 13.00 (16 years old and over)
  • Youth: $ 9.00 (11 to 15 years old)
  • Child: $ 8.00 (4 to 10 years old) – Under 4 years old Free

In addition to their general admission ticket, there are also vacation and season passes as well as group rates for groups like Girl Scouts or Girl Scouts etc.

Related: South Dakota’s Crazy Horse Monument Still Not Completed, But You Should Visit It Anyway

Main exhibitions of the reptile park

As the largest park of its kind in the world, it offers a good number of exhibits full of endless family entertainment. For more information, their events and the species on display, see their website and plan how to have a memorable family day at the world’s largest reptile zoo.


Spring Creek Gulch: Full of fun family activities like gold panning, gem locks, 3D safaris and more

Cheyenne the Bald Eagle: See a bald eagle that has resided in the wildlife zoo for 11 years

Maniac Le Crocodile Gaint: At nearly 16 feet long and weighing 1,250 pounds, he is one of the largest giant crocodiles in the Western Hemisphere

Giant tortoises: See these gentle giants, these Aldabra turtles love attention and are great with kids

The town of prairie dogs: See the black-tailed prairie dogs of the great plains firsthand

Celestial Dome: One of the state’s most recognizable attractions is the Sky Dome. See a tropical oasis on the Great Plains


Next: North Dakota: Why Theodore Roosevelt National Park, Bison & Badlands Are Worth It

tourists crowded on the iguasso bridge in brazil, overtourism

What is over-tourism and what can we do to stop it?


About the Author

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Plans for a reptile zoo in Toronto have been scrapped due to safety and animal welfare concerns https://phrynosoma.org/plans-for-a-reptile-zoo-in-toronto-have-been-scrapped-due-to-safety-and-animal-welfare-concerns/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 20:58:05 +0000 https://phrynosoma.org/plans-for-a-reptile-zoo-in-toronto-have-been-scrapped-due-to-safety-and-animal-welfare-concerns/ Plans for a huge reptile zoo on Toronto’s waterfront appear to be scrapped. Reptilians, the reptile zoo with locations in Vaughan and Whitby, had hoped to bring in a collection of frogs, snakes, alligators, crocodiles, spiders, turtles, lizards and other creatures never seen in d ‘ other zoos at 245 Queens Quay W., between Spadina […]]]>

Plans for a huge reptile zoo on Toronto’s waterfront appear to be scrapped.

Reptilians, the reptile zoo with locations in Vaughan and Whitby, had hoped to bring in a collection of frogs, snakes, alligators, crocodiles, spiders, turtles, lizards and other creatures never seen in d ‘ other zoos at 245 Queens Quay W., between Spadina and Lower Simcoe.

The location near the Harbourfront Center, the CN Tower, Rogers Center and the Ripley Aquarium seemed ideal for tourism, but several animal rights organizations opposed the plan.

Reptilia needed an exemption from the municipal animal bylaw, that forbids alligators, crocodiles, lizards over two meters long and snakes over three meters long.

Several people raised their concerns to a recent City council meeting.

Glenn De Baeremaeker from Zoocheck Canada argued that no public consultation has taken place, that the city lacks oversight capacity and that approval could undermine the city’s reputation as a national leader in the protection of animal welfare.

“Providing an exemption creates a case for other exotic animal companies and institutions to also request exemptions,” Baeremaeker wrote.

Baeremaeker also argued that the Toronto Zoo could be hit financially and that the Toronto Zoo already offers a range of reptile species for viewing and education in a non-commercial setting.

Other opposing people worried about safety.

Zoologist Ronald Orenstein wrote that “exotic reptiles are well-known sources of salmonella and other diseases”.

Sheryl Fink, Director of Canadian Wildlife Campaigns for the International Fund for Animal Welfare, said: “The exotic animal trade – which is directly and indirectly supported by commercial enterprises such as Reptilia – is widely recognized as a threat to wildlife populations, disrupting natural ecosystems, a risk to native wildlife populations wherever non-native exotic animals are kept, and poses an infectious disease threat to human health and safety. “

There were also supporters of the zoo. The York Quay Neighborhood Association expressed strong support in letter to the board.

In one presentation to the board, Reptilia said their animals receive the highest standards of care, come from rescues and are not taken from the wild, and that the zoo has a zero tolerance policy for abuse.

For those who fear snakes or other reptiles may escape, Reptilia is convinced that it will not happen.

“Since opening, Reptilia has never had an animal escape,” the zoo said. “We make sure we continue on this path by always improving our policies and training. All exhibits are checked daily by staff to ensure the animal cannot escape.”

Toronto City Council rejected the exemption but Pedro Funes, Managing Director of Reptilia Inc. tells blogTO about the decision taken with incorrect reptile information.

“Reptilia will appeal the decision and aim to provide additional objective information and reasoning to demonstrate our case for our reptiles,” Funes said. “Our hope is, as always, that we can educate and encourage the acceptance and conservation of reptiles, like any other animal.”

This story has been updated with a comment from Reptilia.

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Discovery of giant marine reptile skull reveals new evolutionary theories https://phrynosoma.org/discovery-of-giant-marine-reptile-skull-reveals-new-evolutionary-theories/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 19:36:00 +0000 https://phrynosoma.org/discovery-of-giant-marine-reptile-skull-reveals-new-evolutionary-theories/ The giant ichthyosaur fossil – with a skull measuring almost two meters (6.6 feet) long, an estimated body length of over 17 meters (55.7 feet) and a weight of 45 tons – was found in Nevada. Ichthyosaurs are large extinct marine reptiles that dominated the sea more than 200 million years ago. Analysis of the […]]]>

The giant ichthyosaur fossil – with a skull measuring almost two meters (6.6 feet) long, an estimated body length of over 17 meters (55.7 feet) and a weight of 45 tons – was found in Nevada.

Ichthyosaurs are large extinct marine reptiles that dominated the sea more than 200 million years ago. Analysis of the skull of this particular ichthyosaur fossil revealed a new species: Cymbospondylus youngorum.

The skull scan was part of a larger research effort undertaken by an international team to understand how quickly body size changed in ichthyosaurs compared to the body size change in whales – a another group of four-legged terrestrial vertebrates that have come back to life in the sea, just like the ichthyosaur.

Ichthyosaurs grew to a giant body size in a very short time, evolutionarily, about 3 million years ago. In comparison, whales took about 45 million years to reach their largest size, “Lars Schmitz, associate professor of biology at the WM Keck Science Department – the shared science department of Claremont McKenna, Pitzer and Scripps Colleges in Claremont, Calif. – – said in a press release.

Schmitz is part of the team that researched the fossil.

“What this fossil discovery shows is that, if the ecological conditions are right and there is some environmental stability, evolution can proceed remarkably quickly.”

Schmitz worked with a team of international researchers to analyze the fossil, identify the ichthyosaur as a new species, create a phylogenetic tree – a diagram that shows the evolutionary relationships between various biological species – then conducted a computer analysis comparing the rate and type of change in body size of ichthyosaurs to that of whales.

Cymbospondylus youngorum was one of a group of reptiles that returned to the ocean during the Triassic Period – the start of the dinosaur era – and fully adapted to marine life. Schmitz describes him as a “lizard fish”.

The ichthyosaur fossil found in Nevada – which includes a preserved skull, shoulder and arm resembling a fin – was discovered in rocks that preserved a cross section of the fauna that existed around five million years after ” the great death ”. This happened around 252 million years ago, when 81% of the world’s marine life became extinct.

When the skull was discovered, the research team were at first unsure how an animal as large as this could have evolved and survived so soon after the most extinction event. serious on Earth.

A reconstruction of the life of Cymbospondylus youngorum, in a Triassic ocean teeming with life.  Ammonites and squid were abundant in this open ocean environment.

“The oceans of this period were vastly different from our modern oceans,” Schmitz explained. “The modern marine ecosystems that feed whales today are made up of very large plankton, which did not exist when Cymbospondylus youngorum was around. We found a gigantic ichthyosaur that had lived at a time when the oceans were considered incapable of supporting this size of an animal. “

This discovery provided Schmitz and the research team with new insight into how quickly evolution can take place and lead to variety.

“This fossil is an example of how quickly evolution can produce diversity,” Schmitz said. “You can go from zero to 100 in a few million years, which is very fast in terms of evolution.”

Research has been published in the journal Science Thursday.
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Britain’s rarest reptile home restored through five-year effort https://phrynosoma.org/britains-rarest-reptile-home-restored-through-five-year-effort/ Sun, 12 Dec 2021 10:28:16 +0000 https://phrynosoma.org/britains-rarest-reptile-home-restored-through-five-year-effort/ VS rucial refuges for wildlife have been saved thanks to a five-year conservation effort. Moorland has been restored at 41 sites in South Downs National Park in Hampshire and Sussex, providing new habitat for the sand lizard, the UK’s rarest reptile. In total, the sites represent an area roughly equal to 18,000 football fields. The […]]]>
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rucial refuges for wildlife have been saved thanks to a five-year conservation effort.

Moorland has been restored at 41 sites in South Downs National Park in Hampshire and Sussex, providing new habitat for the sand lizard, the UK’s rarest reptile.

In total, the sites represent an area roughly equal to 18,000 football fields.

The Heathlands Reunited initiative, which received £ 2million from the National Lottery Heritage Fund, has also enabled the return and recovery of endangered species, including the Field Cricket, Dartford’s Warbler and the Natterjack Toad.

Sand Lizard (South Downs National Park / PA Wire)

A spokesperson for the national park said: “The project has focused on heathland at 41 sites, stretching from Bordon in Hampshire to Pulborough in West Sussex.

“The need was deep as less than 1% of the old moor remains in the national park and what was left was very fragmented, leaving animals and plants vulnerable to extinction in these isolated island habitats.

“Moors are, in fact, man-made and only exist because our ancestors used them to dig peat for fuel, collect heather and graze animals, unintentionally creating a unique mosaic of habitats without which many plants and animals cannot survive now. “

Among the restored areas was Woolmer Forest, a Site of Special Scientific Interest in Hampshire which is home to 12 of Britain’s native reptile and amphibian species and which is now listed in ‘favorable state’ for wildlife. .

Andrew Lee, director of policy and campaign management at the National Park Authority, said: “We all know biodiversity is under unprecedented threat, but Heathlands Reunited is one of the success stories, showing all that can be accomplished if we make room for nature.

“Seeing animals such as the wood lark, sand lizard and field cricket flourish again is truly inspiring. “

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Uncle of all modern crocodiles: 14-foot-long reptile roamed Wyoming 155 million years ago https://phrynosoma.org/uncle-of-all-modern-crocodiles-14-foot-long-reptile-roamed-wyoming-155-million-years-ago/ Sat, 11 Dec 2021 04:27:22 +0000 https://phrynosoma.org/uncle-of-all-modern-crocodiles-14-foot-long-reptile-roamed-wyoming-155-million-years-ago/ The “uncle” of all modern crocodiles was a spooky 14-foot-long creature that roamed the Serengeti-like landscape of Wyoming around 155 million years ago. A research team led by the University of Hokkaido who discovered a new species of croc-like “goniopholidide” came to this conclusion. (Photo: Getty Images) The discovery of Amphicotyleus milesi the ‘Amphicotyleus milesi’ […]]]>

The “uncle” of all modern crocodiles was a spooky 14-foot-long creature that roamed the Serengeti-like landscape of Wyoming around 155 million years ago.

A research team led by the University of Hokkaido who discovered a new species of croc-like “goniopholidide” came to this conclusion.

(Photo: Getty Images)

The discovery of Amphicotyleus milesi

the ‘Amphicotyleus milesi’ fossil was discovered in the East Camarasaurus Quarry in Albany County, Wyoming, which was named after the location’s dinosaur finds, according to Daily mail.

According to paleontologists, A. milesi weighed about half a ton and had a mouth filled with 30 razor sharp teeth two inches long.

A. milesi was not only the “uncle” of modern crocodiles, according to research author and paleontologist Junki Yoshida of the Japanese University of Hokkaido, but he also showed the genesis of their distinctive diving breathing equipment.

Yoshida argues that, like contemporary crocodilians, Amphicotylus milesi has a rear extension of the nasal passage and a small, curved tongue bone.

This shows that crocodilian ancestors were able to lift the valve at the tongue level by keeping their outer nostrils above the water level. Like modern crocodilians, they could breathe underwater while squeezing their prey in their jaws.

Also read: Snappy Evolution: the secret to the successful adaptation of ancient crocodiles

Adaptation of modern crocodiles

According to experts, the discovery of Amphicotylus gives a new perspective on aquatic adaptation to modern crocodylians.

Submerged, modern crocodiles can hold their breath for up to an hour. While only 25 crocodile species now remain, there were hundreds of them during the time of the dinosaurs, some exceeding 30 feet in length and weighing six times that of A. milesi.

What now Wyoming’s badlands would have looked more like Africa’s Serengeti at the time A. milesi existed in the Upper Jurassic.

Long periods of severe drought would have forced local creatures to adapt, followed by monsoon months that would have filled local waterways.

A. milesi, according to the researchers, would have been an opportunistic predator, consuming everything from small fish to frogs, lizards and turtles, as well as herbivorous dinosaurs and pterosaurs.

Crocodile

(Photo: Getty Images)

Evolution of modern crocodiles

Crocodiles seem to come from another time, when reptiles ruled. However, appearances can be deceptive. Today’s crocodiles are not vestiges of the Jurassic period, but rather a manifestation of a large and diverse family that has existed for over 235 million years ago.

Additionally, crocodiles evolve continuously and at a faster rate than at earlier times in their scaly family history.

New research published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B by University College London anatomist Ryan Felice and colleagues yields the seemingly contradictory result regarding the evolution of crocodylians.

Researchers have found that while appearing to be semi-aquatic antiquities, modern crocodile species from Southeast Asia, Australia and the Indo-Pacific evolve rapidly by comparing three-dimensional models to plot landmarks. anatomical designs on crocodylian heads through time.

Crocodiles have developed the same head shapes over and over again, which is why modern crocodile species look so similar.

Associated article: Northern Territory’s crocodile population suddenly increases after being pushed to the brink of extinction

For more news, updates on crocodiles and similar topics, be sure to follow Nature World News!

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Creeping Wealth: Pride of Gujarat in the Reptile World | Ahmedabad News https://phrynosoma.org/creeping-wealth-pride-of-gujarat-in-the-reptile-world-ahmedabad-news/ Tue, 07 Dec 2021 02:13:00 +0000 https://phrynosoma.org/creeping-wealth-pride-of-gujarat-in-the-reptile-world-ahmedabad-news/ While many bird watchers may flock to sites such as Nalsarovar, Thol or Narayan Sarovar to spot migrating birds, Neelimkumar Khaire, founder of Pune Snake Park – one of India’s oldest snake parks – and former director of Rajiv Gandhi Zoological in Pune Park, visits the state to spot “beauties” such as Slender Coral Snake […]]]>
While many bird watchers may flock to sites such as Nalsarovar, Thol or Narayan Sarovar to spot migrating birds, Neelimkumar Khaire, founder of Pune Snake Park – one of India’s oldest snake parks – and former director of Rajiv Gandhi Zoological in Pune Park, visits the state to spot “beauties” such as Slender Coral Snake or Indian Smooth Snake. Khaire recently wrote the first Gujarat Reptile Field Guide which was launched by Gujarat CM.

Speaking to TOI, Khaire said that the state, due to its diverse landscapes ranging from dense forests to thick forests and hills to plains, has a rich biodiversity of reptiles. “I spent about two years and maybe walked over 20,000 km from Kutch to Dang with the help of nature lovers and local experts to compile the information. Some snakes, for example, generally go unreported in the area, ”Khaire said. “But awareness is the key to conservation. Kutch in particular is very rich and a treat for people like me.

Rishit Shroff, architect and snake rescuer from Ahmedabad, said people often mistake skinks for “legged snakes.” “Fear is a factor that causes people to kill snakes. Not all of them are poisonous, and they only attack when provoked. Good information, especially in developing areas where snakes are often reported, can reduce fear. Khaire documented nine types of turtles / turtles, 37 agama / lizard / gecko / skink, pythons, crocodiles, and 46 other snakes and crocodiles in the state.

PENINSULAR ROCK AGAMA | Found in parts of central Gujarat
Usually brown with dark markings on the body, males turn bright red during mating season. They are mainly found on rocks and rocky outcrops. They are diurnal (active during the day) and feed on lizards and small rodents.
SEA TURTLE IN FAUROCHE | Found throughout coastal Gujarat
One of the smallest sea turtles in the world, they weigh up to 35-45 kg. The carapace (upper surface of the shell) is olive in color and its fins have two claws. Males never visit the shore, while mature females visit the shore once or twice to lay their eggs.
HARDWICK SPINY TAIL LIZARD | Found in some areas of Saurashtra-Kutch
Growing up to 50 cm in length, lizards are distinguished by their segmented spiny tail and grainy scales. The terrestrial agamid is only visible in arid landscapes. They live in colonies dug in burrows and are herbivores.
GECKO DE KUTCH AND GECKO DE GUJARAT | Found in Kutch and Girnar respectively
Named specifically after the region, the Kutch gecko grows up to 10cm and has a slender body with distinct cone-shaped tubercles (small rounded bone tips). They feed on insects. The Gujarat gecko, on the other hand, can be identified with a head slightly larger than the neck and a tail almost as long as the body. They can be seen on boulders mainly during summers.
GECKO LÉOPARD DES ANTILLES | Found in the arid regions of Saurashtra-Kutch
One of the largest geckos measuring 25cm, it has plump, movable eyelids. Named because of its pattern, geckos have tails that are slightly shorter than their bodies. Nocturnal and living on the ground, they feed on insects, scorpions and small vertebrates.
THE SNAKE ON SMALL SCALES KUTCH | Found in Saurashtra-Kutch
These lizards are found in open and arid habitats. They have two side bands running from eye to tail and snout to tail. The limbs end in large claws.
YELLOW SPOTTED WOLF SNAKE | Found in Bhavnagar, Vadodara and Surat
The non-poisonous snake can grow to 2 feet. Rarely seen, little is known about its natural history. Black with bands made up of yellow spots, he has completely black eyes. If disturbed, it can curl up and hide its head in the spool.
INDIAN ORNATE FLYING SNAKE | Found in Dang
The semi-venomous snake has smooth scales except for the upper scales which are slightly keeled. Inhabiting trees, snakes can flatten their bodies and launch themselves into the air to travel from branch to branch. It can climb trees faster than any other snake.
MINOR SNAKE EYE SKINK | Found in the arid region of Saurashtra-Kutch
They have a tail that is longer than the body and are up to 15 cm long. A dark brown band runs from the tip of the muzzle to the hind limbs. The scales on the dorsal surface are large, smooth and symmetrical.
INDIAN SNAKE RAT | Found throughout Gujarat
The non-poisonous snake can grow up to 11 feet. Long-bodied and smooth-scaled, the snake is common in farmland where it feeds on rats, toads, lizards, and even small birds. He can climb trees and swim. One of the fastest snakes in India, it swells its neck and hisses if disturbed.
BRILLIANT EARTH AGAMA | Found in northern Gujarat, Saurashtra-Kutch
Normally brown with markings on their bodies, males turn blue with yellow tails during mating season. The terrestrial agamid is only observed in arid landscapes and is mainly insectivorous.
BOA DES SABLES COMMON | Found throughout Gujarat
Grows up to 94 cm, it is a non-poisonous snake with keeled scales and a short, sharp pointed tail. They have small eyes with vertical pupils and nostrils set high on the head. They dig in the ground. They are active from dawn to dusk. If disturbed, initially flattens the body and hides the head under the coil.
COMMON VINE SNAKE | Found in southern and central Gujarat
Bright green and slender, the semi-venomous snake can grow up to 6.5 feet. Also known as the green whip snake, it has smooth scales and large yellow eyes. Mainly arboreal (living on trees), it can descend to the ground to hunt. If disturbed, may enlarge the upper body to display a black and white pattern under the scales.
SOFT STAINED SKIN | Found throughout Gujarat
Sometimes confused with the “legged snake,” skinks are closer to lizards than snakes. The distance between the front and hind legs is about 2-3 times that of the distance between the head and the front legs. The scale has prominent black spots and yellow stripes on both sides of the body. A burrowing species, it is often found near human habitat and feeds on insects.
RUSSELL VIPER | Found throughout Gujarat except Kutch
The large, poisonous snake is identified by its distinct dark brown or oval markings with white borders. It is found around anthills, ratholes, fields and meadows. Avoid humidity. They make a loud hissing sound when disturbed. Their venom is very dangerous and they can spray it up to 2 feet.
GREEN KEELBACK | Found in southern, central and northern Gujarat
Stocky green body with keeled scales, adults sometimes have black markings. The blue-black bands on the young disappear with age. Found in grasslands and thick forests, they are sometimes also spotted in cities. They feed on toads, frogs and lizards. When disturbed, it can rear its head like a cobra.
SNAKE CAT OF BEDDOME | Found in Dang
The semi-venomous snake has a large head and golden cat-like eyes with vertical black pupils. Ash brown in color with dark brown or black markings and dark brown stripes behind the eyes. They are nocturnal and are found on trees and bushes. Feeds mainly on lizards, small birds, mice and geckos. Vigorously vibrates the tip of its tail when disturbed.
GLASSES COBRA | Found throughout Gujarat
The most famous among snakes, the cobra has the distinct hood that it extends when disturbed. Venomous, the cobra can spit its venom up to 60 cm. It prefers to live near water and feeds on frogs, mice and even small snakes.
Cobras are territorial and spend their life in their territories.

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Extremely rare blue-tongued lizard with two heads in Australian reptile park https://phrynosoma.org/extremely-rare-blue-tongued-lizard-with-two-heads-in-australian-reptile-park/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 03:25:00 +0000 https://phrynosoma.org/extremely-rare-blue-tongued-lizard-with-two-heads-in-australian-reptile-park/ Incredible video shows extremely rare blue-tongued lizard with two heads in Australian reptile park Fortunately, the two-headed lizard has gone viral thanks to its extremely rare appearance. Viewers were in awe of Lucky’s second prominent head Lucky received a home at the Australian Reptile Park in early 2019 By Ashlea Knickel For Daily Mail Australia […]]]>

Incredible video shows extremely rare blue-tongued lizard with two heads in Australian reptile park

  • Fortunately, the two-headed lizard has gone viral thanks to its extremely rare appearance.
  • Viewers were in awe of Lucky’s second prominent head
  • Lucky received a home at the Australian Reptile Park in early 2019










An extremely rare two-headed blue-tongue lizard has taken up residence in an Australian zoo after a member of the public made the bizarre discovery.

A video of the rare reptile, named Lucky, exploded on Instagram after @jayprehistoricpets shared the footage last Thursday.

The video wowed viewers, who were amazed by the two heads of Lucky.

Thankfully (pictured) the blue-tongued double-headed lizard has gone viral thanks to its weird appearance

“This lizard blew me away!” Wrote one viewer.

“Amazing double,” added another.

The unique lizard was given to Australian reptile park, north of Sydney, early 2019.

The rare reptile (pictured) was donated to the Australian Reptile Park in early 2019 by a member of the public

The rare reptile (pictured) was donated to the Australian Reptile Park in early 2019 by a member of the public

Animals with deformities like Lucky’s tend to have a shorter lifespan as they have difficulty eating and have a hard time avoiding predators. So it’s lucky that a member of the public spotted the strange reptile.

Two-headed animals have been around for centuries, with reptiles being the most likely to develop the odd second head.

Scientists have named the phenomenon “diprospus” and there is still debate about the causes of the disease.

Blue lizards are common throughout Australia and can often be found in the bush or in people’s backyards.

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Reptile expert remembers being bitten by a king cobra while recovering from MBE https://phrynosoma.org/reptile-expert-remembers-being-bitten-by-a-king-cobra-while-recovering-from-mbe/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 18:27:26 +0000 https://phrynosoma.org/reptile-expert-remembers-being-bitten-by-a-king-cobra-while-recovering-from-mbe/ R Eptile expert Mark O’Shea has revealed that a king cobra who bit him earlier this year was his favorite snake named Sleeping Beauty. Professor O’Shea, 65, spoke of his survival after venom seeped through his sock when the 10-foot reptile bit his shoe and fell in love with the snakes after trying to catch […]]]>
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Eptile expert Mark O’Shea has revealed that a king cobra who bit him earlier this year was his favorite snake named Sleeping Beauty.

Professor O’Shea, 65, spoke of his survival after venom seeped through his sock when the 10-foot reptile bit his shoe and fell in love with the snakes after trying to catch a viper wild at the age of seven.

Professor O’Shea, who wore a tie with lizards, crocodiles and snakes, said: “I met my first snake in a zoo and it was a boa constrictor, and it was twice as long. that I was grown up at six.

“Then I saw a viper in the wild when I was seven years old in this country.

“It was a wild snake, and I tried to catch it and luckily failed.

“After that I had a grass snake called Escapist, because she did it all the time.

“I just became fascinated with snakes and other people didn’t like them, which I think made me like them a little more.

“Every time I learned something about them, it raised more questions.

“I’ve been around snakes for six decades now and I haven’t stopped learning.

“I am always finding new species and discovering new behaviors that I have never seen before.

“I hope to continue, and being now a professor at the University of Wolverhampton, I am in a position to try to enthuse the next generation of herpetologists.

“So the circle has come full circle for me. “

Professor Mark O’Shea, Professor of Herpetology at the University of Wolverhampton, is appointed MBE (Member of the Order of the British Empire) by the Princess Royal (Aaron Chown / PA) / PA wire

Professor O’Shea said he had suffered several serious snakebites over the years.

“I probably had my first poisonous snake bite in 1975 and that was three weeks after a little boy died of a viper bite in Scotland.

“He was the last to die in this country,” he said.

“The hospital I went to was a pandemonium because they thought I was going to die, and I was the only one who knew I wasn’t going to do it.”

Professor O’Shea also had to be hospitalized after his favorite snake bit his shoe, leaving scratches on his toes that could have been fatal. He then treated the reptile after an operation.

He said: “She was a lovely snake, we called her Sleeping Beauty because she had surgery once and the ketamine kept her awake for four days and nights, 100 hours.

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