Australian Reptile Park zookeepers have bred poisonous Komodo dragons

Watch a VERY excited zookeeper risk his life to help two Komodo dragons mate in the first-ever successful breeding of huge lizards in Australia

  • Zoo keepers at the Australian Reptile Park carefully introduced the mating pair
  • In a vision posted to Facebook on August 26, the zookeeper explained the dangers
  • If the Komodo have become aggressive guardians, they must put their bodies on the line
  • Komodo dragons secrete venom when bitten, which can be life-threatening










“It’s finally happened, we have mated Komodo dragons.”

Those were the words of Australian Reptile Park’s Daniel Rumsey, who was visibly excited when he and his team pulled off the Australian premiere this week.

The reptile expert, who risked his life to pair up two Komodos at NSW’s Central Coast Zoo, has explained why the feat is so remarkable – and equally dangerous.

“Komodo dragons are the largest living lizard species, they are practically modern day dragons and a bite from a Komodo dragon is one of the worst bites on the planet,” he said in a video uploaded to the Australian Reptile Park Facebook page.

Australian Reptile Park’s Daniel Rumsey was visibly excited when he and his team performed Australia’s first this week

“Dragons in captivity have been known to cause serious injury to each other, especially when pairing occurs at the wrong time.

“If that happens it’s not just bad for the Komodos, it’s bad for the keepers because we may have to step in to separate the lizards, literally separate them – putting our hands and arms at risk to prevent lizards from harming themselves.

Although it is widely believed that Komodo dragons harbor bacteria in their saliva, they actually secrete venom, similar to poisonous snakes, and can kill a human within hours of a bite.

In the remarkable footage, the male dragon named Kraken is visibly keen to enter the female Komodo’s enclosure.

The dangerous process requires zookeepers to be prepared to put their bodies at risk if the lizards become aggressive

The dangerous process requires zookeepers to be prepared to put their bodies at risk if the lizards become aggressive

The guards then let him into the compound where the female dragon, Daenerys, awaits him.

When they come into contact, Kraken first exhibits the defensive behaviors that worry the zookeepers and Mr. Rumsey warns everyone to take a step back.

But after a while, the zookeepers confirm that the pair were successfully mating.

“Quick guys, come on, it’s happening. What we’re seeing now is really positive behavior, the female is quite receptive to Kraken,” Mr Rumsey said happily.

‘YES! That’s it! It is exactly what we expected. It’s finally happened, we have mated Komodo dragons.

A bite from a Komodo dragon can be life-threatening.  The predator secretes a venom similar to that of poisonous snakes

A bite from a Komodo dragon can be life-threatening. The predator secretes a venom similar to that of poisonous snakes

Although this introduction was a success, Mr. Rumsey explained the difficulty of matching two of the huge lizards.

“No one has successfully bred Komodo dragons in this part of the world, what we’re hoping to see is that she digs a nest chamber and lays whatever eggs she can lay,” he said. he declares.

“I love these Komodo with all my heart and seeing these behaviors is truly one of the greatest achievements of my career.”

In the remarkable footage, the male dragon named Kraken is visibly keen to enter the female Komodo's enclosure.

In the remarkable footage, the male dragon named Kraken is visibly keen to enter the female Komodo’s enclosure.

Now zookeepers have to wait to see if they have any Komodo dragon hatchlings after a long incubation period.

The largest lizard in the world has an excellent sense of smell and can grow up to three meters in length, making it an effective predator.

The Komodo dragon is listed as a vulnerable species, which means it is at high risk of extinction in the wild.

The dragons were breeding successfully, and now zookeepers at the Central Coast Reptile Park have to wait to see if they have any Komodo dragon hatchlings

The dragons were breeding successfully, and now zookeepers at the Central Coast Reptile Park have to wait to see if they have any Komodo dragon hatchlings

Comments are closed.